A Mid-Century Home with New Sustainable Features

Sustainable midcentury home

Bau10 architecture, a “design practice operating at the forefront of the profession providing design and consultation services for residential” shines in this new project updating a mid century bungalow in California’s Venice Beach.

The project, which began in April 2016 and wrapped up in September 2018, seeked to replace an existing 1940s single level house with two single family residences in the buzzing beach town of Venice Beach.

Sustainable  midcentury home
Sustainable midcentury home -

Known for its bohemian vibe, the design aim was to accommodate two separate houses on a more than 3000 square foot corner lot with three stories and a roof deck. After splitting the lot, each house would have a plot size of 1500 square foot.

The program seeked to increase the density by replacing one single family residence with two residences, each of which housing three bedrooms and three bathrooms. The main floor houses a flexible space that can be converted into either a bedroom or home office depending on the need. The space can likewise even serve as a living room and is highly multifunctional.

Sustainable midcentury home -

The second floor is characterized by an open floor plan that houses spaces used for entertaining – a kitchen, a living area, a dining room, and a fireplace. This “entertaining space” is built into a “Texan limestone cladded accent wall”, giving off a distinct and homey atmosphere for the Alberta house.

Sustainable midcentury home - living room
Sustainable midcentury home

The stylish roof deck features a “spa, fire dish, barbecue and outdoor kitchen”, perfect for enjoying the great California weather. The facade is consisted of a “reflective aluminum composite panel rain screen” and is shared by the two residences. The form of the residences evokes the image of “an open hand catching the sun” – an homage to the enjoyable California sun.

Sustainable midcentury home -

The house also integrates sustainability features such as “solar water heating panels mounted on the roof, prefinished metal façade, reconstituted wood on all walls and ceiling hung wood panels and built- ins, ductless high efficient heat pumps, planter boxes for onsite rain retention allowing for harvesting water for irrigation, low energy LED lighting and low water consumption fixtures”.

The palette of the Alberta house exudes of warm earth tones, dominated with stone and wood material. The fixtures and furniture complement the natural tones with neutral and earth palettes.

Sustainable midcentury home -
Sustainable midcentury home -
Sustainable midcentury home -