Robin Boyd’s Walsh Street House in Melbourne

A household name in and around Victoria Australia, Robin Boyd became famous for his promotion of inexpensive prefabricated homes that incorporated Australian Modernist Architecture.

He was the director of the Royal Victorian Institute of Architecture and also the editor for the newspaper The Age for which he wrote weekly articles especially dedicated to modern architectural aesthetics and functional planning.

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The Robin Boyd Walsh Street House in Melbourne is a perfect example of Australia’s most celebrated modernist architectural design.

It is a spectacular and unique design. The house has a floating roof, supported by steel cables giving it almost a Japanese feel but still unique in it’s characteristics.

The brick walls on either side provide privacy from neighbors and inside a courtyard separates the living quarters for the adults with the backside of the house baptized as the children’s’ living area. From both sides, glass curtain walls overlook into the courtyard creating the outside inside spectrum.

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The main living area is on an elevated mezzanine, overlooking the courtyard. It served as both the main living and entertainment area.

The entrance to the house is on the second level from the right side of the street which is connected to an elevated bridge. From the main living area there’s a balcony that gives access to the courtyard.

The space below the main living area serves as kitchen, dining area and family room. A magnificent combination of wood, brick and glass gives this house a feeling of warm and welcome especially by the clever use of bold colors to attract the eye.

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Definitely, one of the most defining features of the house is the central courtyard. It’s an oasis of tranquility covered by glass on either side to protect from harsh wind yet allowing the light to flow all across.

It’s complete with a small pond and luscious greenery throughout. The white steel mash shell chairs adorns the center of the courtyard gracefully allowing conversations amongst friends at any time of the day.

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Photos by Darren Bradley

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